Price of adulthood

Financial responsibilities increase significantly after 25

Paying essentials such as utilities and council tax becomes a reality as young adults transition from student life to the workforce. The reality of financial responsibilities often accompanies the excitement of newfound independence during one’s mid-twenties. 

According to research, young workers may find their first salaries insufficient to cover necessities like utilities and council tax. The study reveals that the number of people making regular payments significantly increases among those aged 25 to 34 compared to those aged 18 to 24[1].

The data highlights that only 34% of 18-to-24-year-olds currently pay utility bills, but this figure doubles to 68% among 25-to-34-year-olds. Similarly, internet usage payments rise from 45% for 18-to-24-year-olds to 70% for 25-to-34-year-olds.

Tips for managing regular payments

By following these tips and taking control of their financial responsibilities, young adults can ease the transition from student life to the workforce and set themselves up for a more secure financial future.

Create or review your budget

A household budget can help you afford essential costs and identify potential savings. It can give you peace of mind about whether you can afford your essential expenses and have money left over for any non-essentials. If you already have a budget, it’s worth checking to see if it’s still working for you, especially as many costs have risen over the last few months. 

Looking more closely at your current and past spending habits, you might find ways to cut costs in the future – freeing up some money to put elsewhere. Budgeting apps can analyse your spending and categorise expenses, making finding areas where you can cut costs easier.

Check for savings

Find opportunities to cut costs by switching providers or finding better phone contracts or utility bill deals. It’s always worth seeing if you can cut costs by changing providers or shopping around to see if you can get a better deal on your phone contract or utility bills, for example. 

Nowadays, switching providers is a relatively seamless process, and it can save you substantial amounts. As you age, you should check for any discounts or benefits you’re entitled to.

Set goals and consider ways of saving

Establish clear savings goals and explore options to manage your finances better. Even if you don’t have the money to set aside right now, analysing your options will help you better manage your finances. If you can save, first try to build up a ‘rainy day fund’ for those unexpected expenses that can tip monthly budgets over the edge, like an appliance or car repairs.

Consider long-term savings and retirement planning

Saving into a pension plan offers tax relief on payments, and employers often contribute as well. They offer tax relief on your payments, so putting money into one can cost less than you think. If you have a workplace pension plan, your employer will typically pay into this – usually making a minimum payment of 3% of your earnings (or a portion of them).

In comparison, your minimum personal contribution generally is 5% if your employer pays 3%, with some employers willing to pay more. Some even match the employee payments up to a certain amount – meaning if you can put in more, they will too. It might be worth checking to see what’s possible, as this is a great way to boost your pension savings. Starting contributions early can significantly impact your total retirement fund.

Do you have a clear vision of your financial goals?

Understanding your priorities is essential for building self-assurance and a clear vision of your financial goals. We recognise that each individual has unique objectives and aspirations. We are committed to guiding you through every stage of your wealth journey. Contact us today to learn more.

Source data:

[1] Boxclever conducted research among 6,000 UK adults. Fieldwork was conducted 6 Sept – 16 October 2022. Data was weighted post-fieldwork to ensure the data remained nationally representative on key demographics.

THIS ARTICLE DOES NOT CONSTITUTE TAX OR LEGAL ADVICE AND SHOULD NOT BE RELIED UPON AS SUCH. TAX TREATMENT DEPENDS ON THE INDIVIDUAL CIRCUMSTANCES OF EACH CLIENT AND MAY BE SUBJECT TO CHANGE IN THE FUTURE. FOR GUIDANCE, SEEK PROFESSIONAL ADVICE.